Tuesday, September 12, 2017

Tales of Peril - Dust Jacket Flaps


In the previous post, we looked at the cover art for Tales of Peril. 
Moving inside, here are the contents from the dust jacket flaps:

Front Flap, upper: Quote from the Maze of Peril, Chapter 9, "Visible and Invisible", providing a preview of the battle against the Dagonites.

Front Flap, lower: List of contents. Focuses on highlights, and is more explanatory than the table of contents.

Back Flap, upper: Two paragraph biography of Holmes, different than the one that appeared at the back of the 1986 publication of Maze of Peril. It mentions his medical career, his Korean War service (which I don't think is well known), and gives an overview of his writing career.

Back Flap, lower: Photo of Holmes gaming. I've included a larger version of this photo above. Photo by Steve Pyryeztov. This photo is from the same session as the one near the front of Holmes' book Fantasy Role-Playing Games (1981).

In these photos we see Holmes running a game at his chalk board table in his basement. In his book, Holmes wrote "My own gaming table is spray-painted with "chalk board paint" so that the green surface can be marked with chalk and then, when the characters move on, a new set of doors and walls can be drawn around them. In this way, the little figures never move off the table, they only move to new positions as the scenery shifts around them" (pg 93). 

An earlier photo of Holmes at this same table can be see in the post, Holmes' Little Metal People Take II.

Looking at the above photo in more detail, we see chalked dungeon corridors, and Holmes pointing at a battle occurring at an intersection of these corridors. 

The wizard with staff held aloft vertically appears to be "ME4 Wizard" from Minifigs' Mythical Earth line. Thanks to Tony at the Cryptic Archivist for posting a picture of this figure in the Holmes Basic group recently. I'm sure some of our readers will ID some of the other minis.



Under Holmes' arms are visible at least three of the dime-store Hong Kong-manufactured monsters that inspired the Bulette of D&D. See this post by Tony DiTerlizzi, a former TSR artist, for more history and photos of these toys. I had several sets of these myself as a child. 

An AD&D Players Handbook rests on the table under the elbow of one player, so at this point (1980-81?) they were using the AD&D rules.

Behind the players are shelves of boxes filled with comic books. Each box has a comic, or just the cover, attached to it to show the contents. Between this picture and the one in the book, I can make out one cover for the Incredible Hulk Special 2 (1969)In this picture it's the barely visible box with the "K" to the right of the player with glasses. In the book, the Hulk is clearly visible on the cover.

This post is part of the Tales of Peril Book Club.

Friday, September 8, 2017

Tales of Peril - Cover Art

"Amazon Assault" by Ian Baggley, original art for the front cover of Tales of Peril 

Tales of Peril is a work of art, and the editor Allan Grohe deserves a round of applause for assembling such a beautiful tome.

The stunning front and back covers for Tales of Peril are by the artist Ian Baggley. They illustrate Underworld action scenes from the Maze of Peril novel, which I will mention again when we get to those portions of the story in the read-through.

I wasn't familiar with Ian's work prior to this, but his previous credits include the Astonishing Swordsmen and Sorcerors of Hyperborea RPG, as detailed by grodog here. His Tales of Peril contributor biography states that "he trained at the Toronto School of Art where he focused on drawing, portraiture and oil painting". 

A gallery of Ian's fantasy are can be seen here on his Deviant Art page. I've posted the images from this page above and below so you can see the original art used for the covers.

I love these shadowy brazier-lit compositions, completely fitting for a book that heavily features the mysterious and dangerous Underworld.

The subject matter of the front cover is striking - why is that ship in a cavern? - and the perspective draws your eye right into the scene and the book itself. The back cover subject matter brings to mind Dave Trampier's classic Players Handbook cover, with the giant statue with gem-like eyes, flanked by braziers. It's also sort of a zoom-in of the front cover, where the statue can be seen in background.


"Dagon" by Ian Baggley, original art for the back cover of Tales of Peril

This post is part of the Tales of Peril Book Club.

Tuesday, September 5, 2017

Tales of Peril Book Club




Now that Tales of Peril has been available for a few months, I'm starting a new blog series called the "Tales of Peril Book Club". For it I will read through the entirety of Tales of Peril and make post(s) for each chapter/section. I encourage you to read along with me, and the posts will be directed to those who do, and thus will contain spoilers. You have been warned!

I've already re-read the 1st chapter of the Maze of Peril and made several pages of notes, but the first post(s) will deal with covers/index/introduction/etc, so you have a bit of time to get the first chapter read. I expect writing notes/blog posts to take me longer than actually reading the chapters, so posting frequency may vary depending on my schedule. I may split some chapters up into multiple posts if they are getting long. We'll see how it goes.

If you still need a copy, see How to Order Tales of Peril from Black Blade Publishing.

Index of Posts
Cover Art
Dust Jacket Flaps


Discussion Threads
OD&D Discussion
Dragonsfoot
Knights & Knaves Alehouse
Acaeum
The Piazza
RPG.net
Enworld
Yog-Sothoth

Monday, August 14, 2017

D&D on Barsoom art by Chris Holmes


Dungeons & Dragons on Barsoom, artwork by Chris Holmes, 1980

This fantastic artwork by Chris Holmes shows John Carter battling a Thark, perhaps Tars Tharkas. Chris told me that the sheet was used a player recruitment sheet at a long ago Gen Con and it seems most likely this was 1980 (the art is signed "Chris Holmes 80"). 

The text reads: "Dungeons and Dragons on Barsoom. A Fantasy Role Playing Game on Edgar Rice Burroughs world of Mars. For 8 players Exp. Level 3. Free Event. No Prize. Meet at 10:00 AM SUNDAY Morning and we will try to find a place to play. Sign up below. Chris Holmes", with an update: "We are just to the left of this note".

J. Eric Holmes and Chris had run this same game at Gen Con 78 and 79 as listed in the program books for those conventions. The 1979 program book has the following brief description: "Ever wondered what happened when your character got teleported to Mars? Find out in this small tourney. One session." 

There are no games listed for the Holmes in the 1980 booklet, so I didn't know they had also run this scenario there too until I saw the above.

If you'd like to see more art work by Chris, the gallery on his website was updated recently. Plus there's artwork of his throughout the new Tales of Peril book

Gen Con 50 is this week. I won't be there, but if you are there is a museum where there will be a typed draft of original D&D.

Friday, August 11, 2017

Zenopus Dungeon Factions

Some thoughts on using the encounters in the Sample Dungeon as "factions" vying for control of the dungeon:

Thaumaturgist (Rooms F and S) - This evil magic-user's goal is "to take over the dungeon level". Allies include a charmed smuggler (2nd level fighter) and a pet giant snake. Other resources include his tower (home base), a wand of petrification and a captured ape in a cage.

Per Holmes' advice, I've generally had him react to intruders by fleeing and ordering his lackey to attack, but in the Portown Rumors I positioned him as a potential employer in town. Why not have him play the same role if first encountered in the dungeon? He might parlay with the PCs to get them to aid in taking over the dungeon. An easy first mission would be cleaning out the giant rats in nearby Room G. Other targets might be the goblins in Room A, the giant spider in Room J, the giant crab in Room L,  the pirates/smugglers in Room M, the ghouls in Room P, or any wandering monsters he's encountered.

Following Zenopus' demise, "[o]ther magic-users have moved into town", which I've taken to mean the thaumaturgist, but it also implies at least one other. Perhaps there is a rival M-U also searching for ancient treasures in the dungeon.

Another option is to have the thaumaturgist as a former apprentice of Zenopus who turned his master to stone and used him as the rotating statue in Room F. In this type of scenario there's the potential for restoring Zenopus with the scroll of stone to flesh. Another twist would be to place on the thaumaturgist on the town council, or perhaps as an advisor to one of the lords on the council.

Goblins (Room A) - this group lives in this huge room (120 x 120 feet, the largest in the dungeon) as evidenced by the beds (one for each goblin), tables and benches. Their total number is not defined as Holmes suggests adjusting it on the number of PCs. If goblins are encountered as wandering monsters on this level they could also be part of this group. If more goblins sneak into the area and join the group they may try to expand their area of control.

The only other clue that Holmes gives for goblins' motivations is survival - they will flee or surrender if half the number is killed, and will bargain duplicitously in order to escape. They have knowledge of "the dangerous trap rooms" although it is not clear what this refers to. The ambushing giant spider in nearby Room J is a possibility although it was much weaker in Holmes' original draft (only 1 HD), so I'm not sure if that is what Holmes was referring to. 

The goblins' room is very close to the entrance to the dungeon, with no other encounters between, and they could easily slip to the surface to steal food from the town; in Portown Rumors this activity is responsible for one of the rumors.

They have a good deal of coin (1000 SP, 2000 CP), which means they might be working for someone, perhaps the thaumaturgist. If the PCs offer more money, the goblins would probably provide information or cooperation for the time.

One of their chests is trapped with a sleeping gas. In my version I've added that they know how to make this gas and store in it breakable vials, for use as "sleep bombs" (ala the Green Goblin) to help them escape.

Pirates (Room M) - Another group of indeterminate number; there at least four but with a 1 in 4 chance every turn of 2-5 more arriving with no limit indicated. This group is mainly concerned with maintaining their sea cave hideout in the sea cave. They have a dangerous "guard dog" in the form of the hungry octopus they feed as they row in to keep from attacking them. They are also described as smugglers but are probably not currently moving the goods into town through the dungeon due to the various dangerous monsters in the way. But having them use the dungeon for transport could be a motivation for having them vie for control of the dungeon. Alternately, if their lair is threatened they may go seeking revenge on the offending party. 

The force in Room M are all described as normal men, but they had at least one former member who was a 2nd level fighter (now charmed by the thaumaturgist). This raises the possibility of stronger leaders that are currently elsewhere. If they feel threatened by the town they might assemble a larger force and stage a raid. In this way the current force in Room M could be used as advance force similar to the bandits watching the Keep in the wilderness in B2. 

They have Lemunda the Lovely prisoner. Did they kidnap her with the goal of ransoming her? Or did they catch her spying on them and are now debating what to do?

Ghouls (Room P) - These undead are tied to the cemetery in an ambiguous manner. The room contains some smashed coffins (their own or someone else's?) and the east door "leads to a short dirt tunnel which ends blindly under the cemetery". The coda to the adventure indicates something is going on there: "What inhuman rites are being practiced deep in the ghoul haunted passages beneath the graveyard?" This implies cult activities, which could be another faction. Perhaps the cultists are animating dead bodies - skeletons, zombies, ghouls. The cult would have a leader, possibly an evil curate (5th level Cleric) and many lower level acolytes (Level 1). Perhaps they carry a "sigil" that keeps their undead minions from attacking them. To increase the presence of this faction in the Sample Dungeon, we could add a roving band of cultists to a Wandering Monster table for the level.

Rats (Rooms G, N and RT) - These are not intelligent, but there are many ("there is no end to the rats"). Add a controlling were-rat or two (or even a vampire!) with a base somewhere in the rat tunnels and there's another faction vying for control of the dungeon.

Townsfolk - While the citizens of Portown are not ordinarily encountered in the dungeon, they've got a stake in it since it is under their town and the denizens may pose a threat. Per the coda of the adventure, the townspeople may not take kindly to trouble stirred up from below ("tampering with Things Better Left Alone"). This brings the possibility of invoking the "Angry Villager Rule" - "Anyone who has viewed a horror movie is aware of how dangerous angry villagers are"  (see OD&D, Vol 3, page 24).

However, if the PCs gain some prominence - such as by rescuing Lemunda - the town leaders would probably support any efforts to defeat any and all of the above factions. The form of government is not specified, but Lemunda's father (who I've named Leomund) is described as "a powerful lord in the city above". This implies more than one "lord" to the city, and the intro refers to "the authorities", so perhaps there is a ruling council of lords. Gygax's guidance regarding the Castellan in B2 (see page 7) could be useful for role-playing a town leader such as Leomund and his reaction to the party's exploits.

Tuesday, August 8, 2017

Portown Adventuring Eras

This is a brief outline of the history of Portown, including adventures that could be set in each time period. The dates are set in YBB (Years Before Basic) or YAB (Years After Basic). Some are from the Holmes Sample Dungeon, the rest are extrapolations:

Prehistory: A "pre-human city" of "doubtful history" exists in the future site of Portown. A vast layered underworld is constructed by the Ancient Builders.


~500 YBB: Portown is founded to link "caravan routes from the south to the merchant ships" traveling the Northern Sea. Catacombs beneath the town are constructed, where the former Lords and Ladies of Portown are buried in sarcophagi (see Room N).

100 YBB: Zenopus arrives, builds a tower on the hill over the sea cliffs to the west of town and near the graveyard. Green Dragon Inn established.


~75 YBB: Zenopus excavates beneath his tower in search of ancient treasures. Adventure of the era: Zenopus hires PCs to investigate pre-human tunnels under his tower.


50 YBB: Zenopus vanishes when his tower in engulfed in green flame. "Several of his human servants" escape and relate that he was destroyed by "a powerful force he unleashed in the depths of the tower".
Adventure of the era: Investigate disappearance of Zenopus

~45 YBB: Town demolishes 'haunted' tower.
Adventure of the era: Investigate haunted tower prior to demolition

~5 YBB: Thaumaturgist arrives, builds or moves into a short tower (Room S) not far from the Zenopus ruins.


0 YBB/YAB: Present day. Lord Leomund (Level 10 Fighter) is the ruler of Portown. His daughter Lemunda has just gone missing. The Green Dragon Inn is a popular gathering place for adventurous types. Pirates and smugglers are very active on the Northern Sea. Bodies are going missing from the graveyard, possibly being transformed into ghouls (as in Room P) by cultists. 

Adventures of the era: Sample Dungeon as written, including rescue Lemunda. 
Investigate cult activities; possibly adapt a Call of Cthulhu scenario?

5-35 YAB: Quiet years. Old dungeon entrance sealed by Lord Leomund.

40 YAB: Lady Lemunda (now a L10+ Fighter) now ruler. Adventure of the era: Return to the Tower of Zenopus, deal with new threat(s) in the old dungeon. Pirate & cultists have merged/transmogrified into Dagonites.

(Revised from a post on G+, thanks to Andy C for suggesting I add the "pre-history" era)

See also: Portown Rumors (which are all in relation to the "Present Day" time period)

Sunday, July 23, 2017

Return to the Tower of Zenopus

As I wrote in my last post, this weekend marks 40 years since Origins III in 1977, the first known public release of the Holmes Basic Set. How I am celebrating?

Well, first off - my contributor copy of Tales of Peril arrived, and I opened it up late last night. It's a beautiful book. More on that later.

I'm thinking about a Holmes-inspired game I'd like to run at Gary Con next year. One idea I've had is a Return to the Tower of Zenopus. This would be set 40 years (naturally) after the events of the original when the smugglers were defeated and the dungeon entrance was sealed. Lady Lemunda is now the ruler of the town and trouble is stirring in the old dungeon. I would re-stock the dungeon using material from Maze of Peril, due to the thematic similarities. The pre-generated characters would be Boinger, Zereth & Murray (drawing from their character sheets in Tales of Peril) plus Hortensa, Geoffrey, Brother Ambrose, etc.